Orange and Black Birds: 12 Popular Species in the World

Orange and Black colors that grace a bird’s feathers are like a masterpiece created by nature, reflecting various factors such as diet, habitat, location, and genetics. The way they consume and process carotenoid pigments in their food affects the vivid shades they display on their plumage.”

As backyard bird enthusiasts in Wisconsin, we have learned a lot about the orange and black birds of our area over the past 20 years. For those who live elsewhere, we have consulted the experts at The Cornell Lab of Ornithology and reliable sources to give you comprehensive information.

Contents

1. Altamira Oriole

 The Altamira Oriole is a bird that dazzles with its orange and black feathers. This bird lives in the southern United States and Mexico, where it likes open woodlands and gardens.

Altamira Oriole
AspectInformation
Species NameAltamira Oriole
Scientific NameIcterus gularis
CountryMexico, Central America, South Texas (USA)
Number of Eggs2-4
Incubation Period for EggsAbout 12-14 days
DietMainly insects, nectar, fruits
HabitatWoodlands, scrublands, and gardens
Migration (yes or no)Partially migratory (some populations)
Body SizeApproximately 8-9 inches (20-23 cm)
Body WeightAround 1.3-2.5 ounces (37-71 grams)
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous to humans
Maximum Flight HeightTypically lower canopy of trees
LifespanAbout 7-10 years in the wild
WeatherPrefers warm, tropical climates

Characteristics

Voice

  • Has a melodious and distinct song.
  • Vocalizes with a series of whistles and chattering sounds.

Social Behavior

  • Typically found in small groups or pairs.
  • Establishes territories and communicates through vocalizations.
  • Can be territorial and defend their feeding and nesting areas.

Vocalizations

  • Known for their beautiful and varied songs.
  • Use vocalizations to communicate within their group and establish territory.
  • Vocal repertoire includes whistles and chattering sounds.

Interaction with Humans

  • Found in urban areas, including gardens and parks.
  • Often seen scavenging for food in human settlements, including bird feeders and fruit trees.

2. American Robin

The American Robin is a bird that many Americans know and love. This bird has an orange breast and a cheerful song. It is a type of thrush, not a true robin.

American Robin
AspectInformation
Species NameAmerican Robin
Scientific NameTurdus migratorius
CountryUnited States, Canada, Mexico
Number of Eggs3-5
Incubation Period for Eggs12-14 days
DietOmnivorous
HabitatWoodlands, gardens, parks
Migration (yes or no)Yes
Body Size9-11 inches
Body Weight77-85 grams
Dangerous for humansNot dangerous
Maximum Flight HeightUp to 10,000 feet
Lifespan2-6 years (wild), up to 14 years (captivity)
WeatherPrefers mild to moderate climates, migrates south in winter

Characteristics

  • Voice: Known for its melodious and cheerful song, typically consisting of a series of clear, whistled notes. The song is often described as a musical “cheerily, cheer-up, cheer-up, cheerily” or “tut-tut-tut-tut-tut.”
  • Social Behavior: American Robins are often seen in small to large flocks, especially during migration. They are generally social birds and can be found foraging on lawns and in gardens.
  • Vocalizations: Apart from their song, American Robins produce a variety of calls, including alarm calls when they sense potential threats. These calls are sharp and serve to alert other birds to potential dangers.
  • Interaction with Humans: American robots are commonly found in suburban and urban areas, making them a familiar sight to many people. They are known for their role as a harbinger of spring in some regions, as their arrival is often associated with the changing seasons.

3. Baltimore Oriole

The Baltimore Oriole is a bird that represents the Baltimore Orioles baseball team. This bird has bright orange and black plumage, and it makes amazing hanging nests. It lives in the eastern United States.

Baltimore Oriole
AspectInformation
Species NameBaltimore Oriole
Scientific NameIcterus galbula
CountryNorth America
Number of Eggs3-7
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 12-14 days
DietInsects, fruits, nectar
HabitatDeciduous forests, parks
Migration (yes or no)Yes
Body SizeSmall-medium
Body Weight18-34 grams
Dangerous for HumansNo
Maximum Flight HeightUp to 60 feet
Lifespan6-8 years
WeatherPrefers warm climates

Characteristics

Voice:

  • Known for their melodious and flute-like songs.
  • Males sing to establish territory and attract mates with a series of whistles and chattering notes.
  • Females have softer, less elaborate calls.

Social Behavior

  • Generally, Baltimore Orioles are solitary during migration and breeding seasons.
  • They are known to be territorial, defending their nesting sites against intruders.
  • However, they can be seen in loose flocks during migration.

Vocalizations

  • Besides their songs, they produce a variety of chattering and chattering calls.
  • Some calls are used for communication within the pair during nesting.

Interaction with Humans

  • Baltimore Orioles are attracted to gardens and backyard feeders, particularly by offerings of nectar, oranges, and jelly.
  • Birdwatchers and enthusiasts often enjoy their vibrant plumage and sweet songs.

4. Blackburnian Warbler

The Blackburnian Warbler is a bird that shines with its black-and-orange throat. This bird is one of the most colorful warblers in North America. It breeds in northern forests and migrates to Central and South America.

Blackburnian Warbler
AspectInformation
Species NameBlackburnian Warbler
Scientific NameSetophaga fusca
CountryNorth America
Number of EggsTypically 3-5
Incubation Period for EggsAbout 12 days
DietInsects, spiders, and larvae
HabitatConiferous and mixed forests
Migration (yes or no)Yes
Body SizeSmall, about 4.5 to 5 inches
Body WeightApproximately 9-12 grams
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous
Maximum Flight HeightIn the treetops
LifespanUp to 10 years
WeatherPrefers temperate climates

Characteristics

Voice

  • High-pitched and musical songs
  • A series of clear, thin notes
  • Often heard during the breeding season
  • Males sing to establish territory and attract mates

Social Behavior

  • Generally solitary during migration
  • Forms breeding pairs during the breeding season
  • Migrates in mixed-species flocks with other warblers

Vocalizations

  • Song characterized by a series of high, thin, and sweet notes
  • The alarm call is a sharp “chip” or “tseet”
  • Contact call during migration is a soft “seet”

Interaction with Humans:

  • Popular among birdwatchers for its striking appearance
  • Encountered during migration in North America
  • Conservation efforts in place to protect their breeding habitats in boreal forests

5. Black-headed Grosbeak

The Black-headed Grosbeak is a bird that charms with its black head and vibrant plumage. This bird has a wide range of habitats, from forests to gardens. It lives in the western United States.

Black-headed Grosbeak
AspectInformation
Species NameBlack-headed Grosbeak
Scientific NamePheucticus melanocephalus
CountryNorth and Central America
Number of EggsTypically 3-4 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 12-14 days
DietOmnivorous, feeding on insects, fruits, and seeds
HabitatWoodlands, forests, and shrubby areas
Migration (yes or no)Yes, migratory
Body SizeApproximately 7-8 inches (18-20 cm)
Body WeightAround 1.5-2 ounces (43-57 grams)
Dangerous for HumansNot considered dangerous to humans
Maximum Flight HeightTypically found in lower and mid-level forest canopy
LifespanAverage lifespan of 4-6 years
WeatherPrefers temperate climates with mild to warm summers and mild winters

Characteristics

Voice

  • Males have a melodious song consisting of rich whistles and trills.
  • Their song is often described as flute-like and can be heard during the breeding season.

Social Behavior

  • Black-headed Grosbeaks are generally solitary during the non-breeding season.
  • During the breeding season, they establish breeding territories and can become more territorial and aggressive in defending their space.

Vocalizations

  • Apart from their song, they also have various calls, including sharp “chink” calls.
  • These calls are used for communication between individuals and may serve as alarm calls in the presence of potential threats.

Interaction with Humans

  • Black-headed Grosbeaks may visit bird feeders, especially if provided with sunflower seeds or other suitable food.
  • Birdwatchers often enjoy observing these birds during their breeding season when their vibrant plumage is most striking.

6. Bullock’s Oriole

 The Bullock’s Oriole is a bird that matches the Baltimore Oriole in beauty. This bird has orange plumage and a black crown, and it lives in the western United States.

Bullock’s Oriole
AspectInformation
Species NameBullock’s Oriole
Scientific NameIcterus bullockii
CountryNorth America (primarily)
Number of Eggs3-7
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 12-14 days
DietMostly insects and nectar
HabitatWoodlands, riparian areas
Migration (yes or no)Yes, migratory
Body SizeSmall
Body WeightAbout 20-33 grams (0.7-1.2 oz)
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous to humans
Maximum Flight HeightTypically low to mid-level
Lifespan4-6 years in the wild
WeatherPrefers mild and temperate climates

Characteristics

Voice

  • Melodious and flute-like whistles.
  • Males sing to establish territories and attract mates.
  • Females may produce softer, chattering calls.

Social Behavior

  • Typically found in open woodlands and riparian areas.
  • Migratory birds, spend summers in North America and winters in Mexico.
  • Often seen foraging for insects and nectar in trees.

Vocalizations:

  • Males produce a clear, whistled song with varied phrases.
  • Calls include chattering, chupping, and chattering noises.
  • Vocalizations are essential for communication within their social groups.

Interaction with Humans:

  • Bullock’s Orioles may visit backyards with suitable habitats and food sources.
  • Their colorful plumage and musical songs make them a delight for birdwatchers.
  • Conservation efforts aim to protect their habitats to ensure their continued presence in the wild.

7. Eastern Towhee

 The Eastern Towhee is a bird that thrives in dense thickets. This bird has a distinctive call that sounds like “drink-your-tea”. It lives in the eastern United States.

Eastern Towhee
AspectInformation
Species NameEastern Towhee
Scientific NamePipilo erythrophthalmus
CountryUnited States, Canada, Mexico
Number of EggsUsually 2-6
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 10-14 days
DietInsects, seeds, fruits, and berries
HabitatBrushy areas, woodlands, and shrublands
Migration (yes or no)Partial, some populations migrate
Body Size7.1-9.1 inches (18-23 cm)
Body Weight1.1-2.1 ounces (32-59 grams)
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous; shy and non-aggressive
Maximum Flight HeightTypically low to the ground
LifespanUp to 10 years in the wild
WeatherPrefers temperate and warm climates

Characteristics

Voice:

  • Eastern Towhees are known for their distinctive “drink-your-tea” song, which consists of a series of clear and musical notes that sound like they are saying “drink your tea.”

Social Behavior:

  • Eastern Towhees are primarily solitary birds during the breeding season, often defending territories.
  • They are ground foragers, scratching through leaf litter in search of insects, seeds, and other food items.

Vocalizations:

  • Besides their characteristic “drink-your-tea” song, Eastern Towhees also make sharp “chink” calls that are used for communication and alerting others to potential threats.
  • Their vocalizations can vary depending on the context, such as courtship or territorial disputes.

Interaction with Humans:

  • Eastern Towhees are often found in scrubby, brushy habitats and are sometimes seen in gardens or suburban areas with suitable vegetation.
  • Birdwatchers and nature enthusiasts appreciate their distinctive song and may attract them to bird feeders with appropriate offerings like seeds and insects.

8. Orchard Oriole

 The Orchard Oriole is a bird that delights with its vibrant coloration. This bird is smaller than other orioles, and it can be found in orchards, gardens, and woodlands across North America.

Orchard Oriole
AspectInformation
Species NameOrchard Oriole
Scientific NameIcterus spurius
CountryNorth America
Number of EggsUsually 3-4 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 12-14 days
DietInsects, nectar, fruit
HabitatWoodlands, orchards, parks
Migration (yes or no)Yes
Body SizeSmall (6-7 inches)
Body WeightAbout 1 ounce
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous
Maximum Flight HeightTypically low-flying
Lifespan2-4 years
WeatherPrefers warm and mild

Characteristics

Voice

  • High-pitched and melodious song.
  • Males sing to establish territory and attract mates.
  • Females have a softer and more subdued song.

Social Behavior

  • Generally solitary during the breeding season.
  • Form loose flocks during migration.
  • Can be found in mixed-species foraging groups.

Vocalizations

  • A typical call is a series of whistles and chattering notes.
  • The song resembles a series of musical whistles and warbles.

Interaction with Humans

  • May visit backyard feeders, especially if offering fruit or nectar.
  • Enjoy orchards and garden habitats, often near human settlements.

9. Red-winged Blackbird

The Red-winged Blackbird is a bird that is often seen near wetlands. This bird has striking red shoulder patches that contrast with its black body. It has a distinctive call that sounds like “conk-a-ree”.

Red-winged Blackbird
AspectInformation
Species NameRed-winged Blackbird
Scientific NameAgelaius phoeniceus
CountryNorth America
Number of EggsTypically 3-4 eggs
Incubation PeriodApproximately 11-13 days
DietOmnivorous, eats insects, seeds, and more
HabitatMarshes, wetlands, grasslands, and fields
MigrationYes, during winter to southern regions
Body SizeAbout 7-9 inches in length
Body WeightAround 1.5-2 ounces
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous, but may defend nests
Maximum Flight HeightTypically flies within a few meters of ground
LifespanTypically 2-3 years in the wild
WeatherTolerant of various weather conditions

Characteristics

Voice

  • Distinctive, loud, and melodious song, often described as “conk-la-ree.”
  • Males use their song to establish territory and attract mates.
  • Females have a softer, more melodious call.

Social Behavior

  • Highly social birds are often found in flocks, especially during the non-breeding season.
  • Form breeding colonies in marshes and wetlands.

Vocalizations

  • Besides their territorial song, they produce various calls, including a high-pitched “chek” call.
  • Calls are used for communication within the flock and during interactions with other birds.

Interaction with Humans

  • Frequently encountered by birdwatchers and outdoor enthusiasts in wetland habitats.
  • Can be attracted to bird feeders with appropriate food offerings.

10. Spotted Towhee

The Spotted Towhee is a bird that stands out with its bold black and white plumage. This bird lives in the western United States, where it sings melodiously from the ground or low perches.

Spotted Towhee
AspectInformation
Species NameSpotted Towhee
Scientific NamePipilo maculatus
CountryNorth America
Number of EggsUsually 3 to 5 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 12-14 days
DietInsects, seeds, berries
HabitatScrublands, forests
Migration (yes or no)Partially migratory
Body SizeSmall to medium-sized
Body WeightAbout 1.1 to 1.6 ounces
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous
Maximum Flight HeightLow to moderate heights
LifespanTypically 2-4 years
WeatherFound in a variety of weather conditions, from hot to cold.

Characteristics

Voice

  • Distinctive “chewink” call.
  • Song characterized by a series of repetitive notes.

Social Behavior

  • Typically solitary, but may form loose pairs during the breeding season.
  • Forages on the ground, scratching for food in leaf litter.

Vocalizations

  • “Chewink” call often used to establish territory.
  • The song consists of fast, repetitive trills and chirps.
  • Males sing to attract mates and defend territory

Interaction with Human

  • Often found in suburban and woodland areas, making it a common backyard bird.
  • May visit bird feeders for seeds and insects.
  • Generally not very timid around humans, allowing for close observations.

11. Western Tanager

The Western Tanager is a bird that adds a touch of color to the western forests. This bird has yellow plumage with contrasting black wings throoats is orange, and it breeds in the western United States and Canada.

Western Tanager
AspectInformation
Species NameWestern Tanager
Scientific NamePiranga ludoviciana
CountryWestern North America
Number of EggsTypically 3-5 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 12-14 days
DietInsects, fruits, and berries
HabitatConiferous and mixed woodlands
Migration (yes or no)Yes
Body SizeSmall, about 6-7 inches (15-18 cm)
Body WeightAround 20-24 grams
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous; shy and non-aggressive
Maximum Flight HeightUp to 6,000 feet (1,800 meters)
LifespanTypically 4-6 years in the wild
WeatherFound in various weather conditions, but prefers temperate climates

Characteristics

Voice:

  • Characterized by a melodic and cheerful song.

Social Behavior:

  • Often found in loose flocks during migration and while foraging.

Vocalizations

  • Known for their high-pitched calls and trills, with a variety of chirps and whistles.

Interaction with Humans:

  • Attracted to feeders with fruits and nectar, making them a favorite among birdwatchers.

12. Black-and-Orange Flycatcher

The Black-and-Orange Flycatcher is a bird that showcases North American bird diversity with its black and orange plumage. This flycatcher lives in the dense forests of Southeast Asia, where it feeds on insects.

Black-and-Orange Flycatcher
AspectInformation
Species NameBlack-and-Orange Flycatcher
Scientific NameNameus scientificalis
CountryVarious countries in Asia
Number of EggsTypically 2-4 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 14-16 days
DietInsects, small invertebrates
HabitatForests, wooded areas, hillsides
Migration (yes or no)Seasonal migration
Body Size12-15 centimeters (4.7-5.9 inches)
Body Weight12-20 grams
Dangerous for humansNot dangerous
Maximum Flight Height30-40 meters (98-131 feet)
LifespanApproximately 5-7 years
WeatherPrefers temperate climates

Characteristics

Voice:

  • High-pitched, melodious calls
  • Distinctive, repetitive ‘chee-chee-chee’ or ‘tsip-tsip-tsip’ sounds
  • Vocalizations used for communication and territory defense

Social Behavior:

  • Solitary or found in pairs during the breeding season
  • Migratory behavior, with some populations wintering in different regions
  • Typically seen perching in the mid-story or canopy of forests

Vocalizations:

  • Male’s songs used to attract females and establish territory
  • Females may respond with softer calls during courtship
  • Alarm calls to warn of predators or intruders

Interaction with Humans:

  • Generally shy and elusive around humans
  • More likely to be heard than seen due to its forested habitat and cautious nature
  • Limited interaction in urban or suburban areas due to its preference for dense forests

FAQ’s

What is the average lifespan of a parrot?

Parrots can live anywhere from 15 to 80 years, depending on the species.

Do all owls hunt at night?

No, while many owls are nocturnal, some hunt during the day.

What’s the largest species of penguin?

The Emperor Penguin holds the title for the largest penguin species.

Are flamingos naturally pink?

 No, they are born with gray feathers and turn pink due to their diet.

Can toucans fly well?

 Yes, toucans are strong fliers, despite their large bills.

How fast can a cheetah run?

Cheetahs can reach speeds of up to 70 miles per hour in short bursts.

What’s the difference between a crocodile and an alligator?

 Crocodiles have a V-shaped snout, while alligators have a U-shaped snout.

Do hummingbirds migrate?

Yes, many hummingbird species migrate long distances.

What’s the smallest breed of dog?

The Chihuahua is often considered the smallest dog breed.

Can snakes hear?

Snakes can’t hear in the traditional sense but can detect vibrations through their jawbone.