25 Amazing Brown Birds In the World

Because their brown feathers help them remain warm and conceal themselves, brown birds got their name. The variety of brown bird species varies according to their habitat.

Depending on where they dwell, brown birds may survive in a variety of climates. Brown birds are found in various sizes; little sparrows can weigh as much as a handful of grapes, while large eagles can weigh as much as a bag.

Bird SizeNumber of Eggs Laid
Small Brown Birds2 to 8
Larger Brown Birds1 or 2
Factors Affecting Egg CountHabitat and Food Availability
Individual CasesMay vary

House Sparrow

The British Sparrow, or House Sparrow, is a tiny, brown bird that is frequently observed in suburban and downtown areas. Its gregarious nature and flexibility are well-known.

Range and Habitat: Originally native to Europe and Asia, but now found worldwide in urban and suburban areas.

Diet: Seeds, grains, and some insects.

Nesting Habits: They nest in cavities, often in buildings and nest boxes.

House Sparrow
AspectInformation
Species NameHouse Sparrow
Scientific NamePasser domesticus
CountryWidespread, worldwide
Number of Eggs2-7 (typically 4-5)
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 11-14 days
Migration (yes or no)No
Body SizeSmall
Body Weight25-39 grams
Dangerous for HumansGenerally not dangerous
Maximum Flight HeightLow to moderate altitudes
WeatherCan adapt to various climates
Birds (yes or no)Yes
Total TypesVarious subspecies
Total ColorMales: Gray and brown with black throat and chest patch; Females: Duller with no black patch

Eastern Phoebe

The Eastern Phoebe is a little, brown bird that is known for its regular tail-flicking behavior. It’s usually seen in wide areas and close to water.

Range and Habitat: Eastern North America; prefers open woodlands, farmlands, and suburban areas.

Diet: Primarily insects.

Nesting Habits: They build nests on ledges, bridges, or other structures.

Eastern Phoebe
AspectInformation
Species NameEastern Phoebe
Scientific NameSayornis phoebe
CountryFound in North America
Number of EggsTypically 3 to 6 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsAbout 14 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes, migratory bird
Body SizeSmall, about 6-7 inches
Body WeightApproximately 17-21 grams
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous to humans
Maximum Flight HeightTypically low to mid-level
WeatherPrefers open woodlands
Birds (yes or no)Yes, it’s a bird
Total TypesSongbird, passerine
Total ColorBrownish-gray with a white belly and hints of yellowish-brown.

Song Sparrow

The melody The delightful, upbeat song of the little, brown Sparrow bird makes it a popular tune. Seek it out in areas with grass.

Range and Habitat: Found throughout North America in various habitats, including wetlands and grassy areas.

Diet: Seeds, insects, and plants.

Nesting Habits: They create cup-shaped nests in dense vegetation near water.

Song Sparrow
AspectInformation
Species NameSong Sparrow
Scientific NameMelospiza melodia
CountryFound throughout North America
Number of EggsTypically 3-5 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsAbout 12-14 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes, some populations migrate
Body SizeSmall
Body WeightApproximately 20-40 grams
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous
Maximum Flight HeightUsually low to the ground
WeatherTolerates various climates
Birds (yes or no)Yes
Total TypesVaries depending on subspecies
Total ColorBrown and streaked with white

Eastern Wood-Pewee

This little brown bird is highly skilled at eating insects. Forested places and forests are home to it.

Range and Habitat: Eastern and central North America, often in deciduous forests.

Diet: Insects, especially flies and other flying insects.

Nesting Habits: They build cup-shaped nests in trees.

Eastern Wood-Pewee
AspectInformation
Species NameEastern Wood-Pewee
Scientific NameContopus virens
CountryFound in North America
Number of EggsTypically 2 to 3 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 13 to 14 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes, they are migratory birds
Body SizeSmall, about 5.5 to 6 inches
Body WeightAbout 12-16 grams
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous to humans
Maximum Flight HeightTypically fly at lower heights
WeatherPrefers deciduous forests and woodlands
Birds (yes or no)Yes, they are birds
Total TypesSongbird
Total ColorBrownish-gray with a pale belly and a slight crest on the head

American Tree Sparrow

The Tree of America During the winter months, the quaint brown Sparrow makes frequent visits and feeds mostly on seeds and insects.

Range and Habitat: Breeds in the northern parts of North America and migrates south during winter.

Diet: Seeds and insects.

Nesting Habits: Ground nests in tundra and shrubby areas.

American Tree Sparrow
AspectInformation
Species NameAmerican Tree Sparrow
Scientific NameSpizelloides arborea
CountryNorthern North America
Number of EggsTypically 3-6 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 10-12 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes, migratory bird
Body SizeSmall, about 5-6 inches (13-15 cm) in length
Body WeightApproximately 0.6-1.1 ounces (17-31 grams)
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous to humans
Maximum Flight HeightGenerally low-level flight, often within a few meters of the ground
WeatherPrefers cooler climates, and migrates to warmer areas during winter
Birds (yes or no)Yes, it is a bird species
Total TypesOne species
Total ColorBrown and gray with distinct markings, including a rusty cap and dark spot on the chest

Swamp Sparrow

The little brown Swamp Sparrow is attracted to wetland areas and is distinguished by its melodious, cry.

Range and Habitat: Eastern and Central North America in wetland habitats.

Diet: Insects and seeds.

Nesting Habits: Nests in dense marsh vegetation.

Swamp Sparrow
AspectInformation
Species NameSwamp Sparrow
Scientific NameMelospiza georgiana
CountryNorth America
Number of EggsTypically 3-5 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 11-14 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes
Body SizeSmall to medium-sized
Body WeightApproximately 20-30 grams
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous
Maximum Flight HeightLow to moderate altitude
WeatherPrefers wetland habitats
Birds (yes or no)Yes
Total TypesSubspecies may vary
Total ColorBrown, gray, and rust-brown

White-crowned Sparrow

Just as its name implies, this brown bird has a noticeable white crown. It is frequently observed searching the ground for food.

Range and Habitat: Various subspecies are found in North America, often in brushy areas.

Diet: Seeds, insects, and plant matter.

Nesting Habits: They build cup-shaped nests on the ground or low in shrubs.

White-crowned Sparrow
AspectInformation
Species NameWhite-crowned Sparrow
Scientific NameZonotrichia leucophrys
CountryFound in North America
Number of EggsTypically 3 to 7 eggs in a clutch
Incubation Period for EggsAbout 12 to 14 days
MigrationYes, it migrates seasonally
Body SizeApproximately 6.5 to 7.5 inches
Body WeightAround 0.8 to 1.1 ounces (25-31 grams)
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous to humans
Maximum Flight HeightTypically flies at low to moderate altitudes
WeatherFound in a variety of climates and habitats, from open woodlands to grassy areas
Birds (yes or no)Yes, it’s a bird
Total TypesVarious subspecies across its range
Total ColorDistinctive black and white crown stripes, gray and brownish body

Savannah Sparrow

Small and brown, the Savannah Sparrow is frequently observed in grassy, open spaces like pastures and meadows.

Range and Habitat: Found throughout North America, especially in open grasslands.

Diet: Seeds and insects.

Nesting Habits: Nests on the ground in grassy areas.

Savannah Sparrow
AspectInformation
Species NameSavannah Sparrow
Scientific NamePasserculus sandwichensis
CountryFound in North America
Number of EggsTypically 3-6 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsAround 10-14 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes, migratory bird
Body SizeSmall to medium-sized
Body WeightApprox. 0.4 – 1.1 ounces
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous to humans
Maximum Flight HeightTypically low to the ground
WeatherPrefers open grasslands
Birds (yes or no)Yes, it is a bird species
Total TypesMultiple subspecies
Total ColorVaried, often with brown and white plumage

Ovenbird

This unusual bird, which has a nest that looks like an oven, is found in wooded areas.

Range and Habitat: Eastern North America, often in deciduous forests.

Diet: Insects and other invertebrates.

Nesting Habits: Ground nests with a domed roof.

Ovenbird
AspectInformation
Species NameOvenbird
Scientific NameSeiurus aurocapilla
CountryFound in North America
Number of EggsTypically 4-5 eggs in a clutch
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 12-14 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes, it is a migratory bird
Body SizeSmall to medium-sized
Body WeightApproximately 18-24 grams
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous to humans
Maximum Flight HeightCan fly at various heights
WeatherPrefers mature forests
Birds (yes or no)Yes, it’s a bird species
Total TypesOne of many warbler species
Total ColorBrown and white plumage

Snow Bunting

The Snow Bunting is a little brown bird with areas of rusty brown and crisp white on its winter plumage.

Range and Habitat: Arctic and subarctic regions during the breeding season, and they migrate south in the winter.

Diet: Seeds and insects.

Nesting Habits: Ground nests in the Arctic tundra.

Snow Bunting
AspectInformation
Species NameSnow Bunting
Scientific NamePlectrophenax nivalis
CountryArctic and Subarctic Regions during Breeding Season; Migrates South in Winter
Number of EggsTypically 4-6
Incubation Period for EggsAbout 12-14 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes
Body SizeApproximately 6-7 inches
Body WeightAround 1 ounce
Dangerous for HumansNo
Maximum Flight HeightVaries, but generally not very high due to their habitat preferences
WeatherCold and harsh in Arctic breeding areas, milder in wintering regions
Birds (yes or no)Yes
Total TypesMultiple subspecies with slight variations in appearance
Total ColorMales have white bodies with black wings and tails; females are browner

Brown Creeper

The Brown Creeper is an expert at hiding in forested settings because of its characteristic upward-hopping gait on tree trunks.

Range and Habitat: North America, often in mature forests.

Diet: Insects and spiders.

Nesting Habits: Nests behind loose tree bark.

Brown Creeper
AspectInformation
Species NameBrown Creeper
Scientific NameCerthia americana
CountryNorth America
Number of EggsTypically 4-5
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 14-16 days
Migration (yes or no)Partial migratory – some individuals may migrate
Body SizeApproximately 4.5-5.1 inches (11.4-13 cm)
Body WeightAbout 0.3-0.4 ounces (8-12 grams)
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous; shy and non-aggressive
Maximum Flight HeightLow to moderate, usually in tree canopy
WeatherPrefer cool, temperate climates
Birds (yes or no)Yes (it’s a bird)
Total TypesOne species
Total ColorBrown with mottled white and streaked patterns

American Robin

One of the most recognizable birds in North America is the American Robin. Its back is dark, but its breast has a vivid orange-red color.

Range and Habitat: Widespread in North America, often in open woodlands and suburban areas.

Diet: Primarily insects and earthworms.

Nesting Habits: Cup-shaped nests in trees and shrubs.

American Robin
AspectInformation
Species NameAmerican Robin
Scientific NameTurdus migratorius
CountryFound throughout North America
Number of EggsTypically 3-5 eggs in a clutch
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 12-14 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes, migratory bird
Body SizeMedium-sized bird, about 10 inches
Body WeightAbout 2.7 to 3.3 ounces (77-94 grams)
Dangerous for HumansNot considered dangerous to humans
Maximum Flight HeightTypically fly at various heights
WeatherAdapted to various weather conditions
Birds (yes or no)Yes, it’s a bird
Total TypesOne species (American Robin)
Total ColorBrownish-gray back, orange breast

Eastern Towhee

Known for its “drink-your-tea” cry, this huge brown bird is typically found in woodlands and brushy places.

Range and Habitat: Eastern and southeastern North America, often in dense shrubby areas.

Diet: Seeds, insects, and fruits.

Nesting Habits: They build nests on the ground.

Eastern Towhee
AspectInformation
Species NameEastern Towhee
Scientific NamePipilo erythrophthalmus
CountryEastern and Southeastern North America
Number of EggsTypically 2-6 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 12-13 days
Migration (yes or no)Some populations may migrate, while others are year-round residents
Body SizeMedium-sized, about 7-9 inches in length
Body WeightApproximately 1.1 – 2.1 ounces
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous to humans, usually shy and avoids contact
Maximum Flight HeightTypically found near ground or low vegetation, so not known for high flight
WeatherPrefers areas with adequate cover and may avoid extreme weather conditions
Birds (yes or no)Yes, Eastern Towhees are birds
Total Types1
Total ColorBlack, rufous sides, and white undersides; sexes may vary slightly in coloration

Brown-headed Cowbird

The Brown-headed Cowbird is a brood parasite that frequently outwits other bird species by laying its eggs in their nests.

Range and Habitat: Widespread in North America, often in open and semi-open habitats.

Diet: Seeds, insects, and sometimes other birds’ eggs.

Nesting Habits: Cowbirds are brood parasites, laying their eggs in the nests of other bird species.

Brown-headed Cowbird
AspectInformation
Species NameBrown-headed Cowbird
Scientific NameMolothrus ater
CountryNative to North America, but can be found in the United States and Canada
Number of EggsTypically 1-7 eggs in a single nest, usually laid in the nests of other bird species
Incubation Period for EggsAround 10-12 days
Migration (yes or no)Nomadic with some migration behavior
Body SizeAbout 17-23 cm (6.7-9.1 inches) in length
Body WeightApproximately 30-52 grams
Dangerous for HumansNot considered dangerous to humans
Maximum Flight HeightVaries, but typically low to mid-altitudes
WeatherNo specific weather preferences
Birds (yes or no)Yes, it’s a bird species
Total TypesVaries depending on the context
Total ColorIridescent black in males, brown with a hint of iridescence in females

Northern Flicker

This huge brown bird has a distinctive flickering flight that sometimes confuses it for a woodpecker. It is recognized by its unique “wick-a-wick-a” cry.

Range and Habitat: Found throughout North America in various habitats, including woodlands and open areas.

Diet: Insects and ants.

Nesting Habits: They nest in tree cavities.

Northern Flicker
AspectInformation
Species NameNorthern Flicker
Scientific NameColaptes auratus
CountryNorth America, various regions
Number of EggsTypically 5-8 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsAbout 11-13 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes, some populations migrate
Body SizeApproximately 11-14 inches
Body WeightAbout 3-5 ounces (85-140 grams)
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous; shy and non-aggressive
Maximum Flight HeightVaries, but can fly at various heights
WeatherPrefers open habitats, often seen in fields and woodlands
Birds (yes or no)Yes, it’s a bird species
Total TypesThere are several subspecies
Total ColorBrown, black, white, and red on the nape and undersides

Hermit Thrush

Brown and musical, the Hermit Thrush has a lovely, melodic singing. It favors damp, forested settings.

Range and Habitat: North America, often in coniferous and mixed forests.

Diet: Insects, berries, and other fruits.

Nesting Habits: Cup-shaped nests in trees or shrubs.

Hermit Thrush
AspectInformation
Species NameHermit Thrush
Scientific NameCatharus guttatus
CountryNorth America
Number of EggsTypically 3-4 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 12-14 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes
Body SizeSmall to medium-sized
Body WeightAbout 20-35 grams
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous
Maximum Flight HeightVaries, typically low to mid-level altitudes
WeatherFound in temperate forests, various climates
Birds (yes or no)Yes, it’s a bird species
Total TypesSeveral subspecies exist
Total ColorBrownish upperparts, spotted breast, white belly

Cedar Waxwing

Well-known for its sleek look and unusual “wax-like” wingtips, this bird is an expert at eating fruit.

Range and Habitat: North America, often in woodlands and open areas.

Diet: Berries, insects, and fruit.

Nesting Habits: They build open cup-shaped nests in trees.

Cedar Waxwing
AspectInformation
Species NameCedar Waxwing
Scientific NameBombycilla cedrorum
CountryNorth America
Number of EggsTypically 3-5 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsAbout 12-16 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes
Body SizeApproximately 6-7 inches
Body WeightAround 30-35 grams
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous
Maximum Flight HeightTypically low to mid-level
WeatherPrefers temperate climates
Birds (yes or no)Yes
Total TypesMultiple subspecies
Total ColorBrown, gray, and yellow

Common Grackle

The Common Grackle is a big, brown bird with iridescent feathers that is gregarious and boisterous.

Range and Habitat: North America, often in urban and suburban areas.

Diet: Insects, seeds, and grains.

Nesting Habits: They build nests in trees and shrubs.

Common Grackle
AspectInformation
Species NameCommon Grackle
Scientific NameQuiscalus quiscula
CountryFound in North America
Number of EggsTypically 4-7 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 11-14 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes, migratory bird
Body SizeAbout 12-13 inches (30-33 cm)
Body WeightApproximately 2.8-4.2 ounces
Dangerous for HumansGenerally not dangerous to humans
Maximum Flight HeightTypically lower altitudes, often seen near the ground
WeatherCan be found in various weather conditions, adaptable
Birds (yes or no)Yes, it is a bird species
Total TypesSingle species (Common Grackle)
Total ColorIridescent black with hints of purple and green in males, brownish-black in females

Brown Thrasher

Known for its singing repertoire, the Brown Thrasher is frequently spotted in overgrown gardens and fields.

Range and Habitat: Eastern and southeastern North America, often in shrubby habitats.

Diet: Insects, fruits, and seeds.

Nesting Habits: They build cup-shaped nests in dense shrubs.

Brown Thrasher
AspectInformation
Species NameBrown Thrasher
Scientific NameToxostoma rufum
CountryFound in the eastern and southeastern
regions of North America
Number of EggsTypically 3 to 5 eggs in a clutch
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 12-14 days
Migration (yes or no)Primarily a non-migratory species
Body SizeAbout 8.5 to 11.5 inches (22-29 cm)
Body WeightAround 2.2 to 3.5 ounces (62-98 g)
Dangerous for HumansNot considered dangerous to humans
Maximum Flight HeightUsually stays relatively low during
flight, near the ground
WeatherFound in various weather conditions
Birds (yes or no)Yes, it’s a bird species
Total Types1 (Brown Thrasher is a single type)
Total ColorBrownish upperparts, white chest
with streaks, and yellow eyes

Eastern Meadowlark

The Eastern Meadowlark is a big brown bird found in meadows, distinguished by its brilliant yellow breast and brownish back.

Range and Habitat: Eastern and central North America, often in grasslands and open fields.

Diet: Insects and seeds.

Nesting Habits: Ground nests in grassy areas.

Eastern Meadowlark
AspectInformation
Species NameEastern Meadowlark
Scientific NameSturnella magna
CountryFound in North America
Number of EggsTypically 3-7 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 12-14 days
Migration (yes or no)Some populations migrate;
others are year-round residents
Body SizeLength: 8.5-11 inches (21-28 cm)
Body WeightApproximately 2.1-4.3 ounces (60-123 grams)
Dangerous for HumansNot considered dangerous to humans
Maximum Flight HeightVaries, but typically low flight over open grasslands
WeatherPrefers open grasslands and fields
Birds (yes or no)Yes, it’s a bird species
Total TypesThere are various subspecies of Eastern Meadowlark
Total ColorBrownish with distinctive yellow breast and black V-shaped markings on the chest

Lapland Longspur

This bird sticks out from other brown birds with its chestnut-colored face. In the Arctic tundra, it reproduces.

Range and Habitat: Breeds in the Arctic tundra and winters in the northern United States.

Diet: Seeds and insects.

Nesting Habits: Ground nests in the Arctic tundra.

Lapland Longspur
AspectInformation
Species NameLapland Longspur
Scientific NameCalcarius lapponicus
CountryArctic tundra during breeding season, northern migration in winter
Number of EggsTypically 4 to 5 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 12 to 14 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes
Body SizeAbout 15 cm (6 inches) in length
Body WeightApproximately 20 to 30 grams
Dangerous for HumansNo
Maximum Flight HeightVaries with migration, can fly at high altitudes
WeatherTundra climate during breeding, cold and snowy
Birds (yes or no)Yes, it is a bird species
Total TypesIt is a type of bird
Total ColorBrown and white plumage with distinctive markings

Eastern Kingbird

The fierce Eastern Kingbird is renowned for acting aggressively to protect its area.

Range and Habitat: Eastern North America, often near open areas and water.

Diet: Insects, especially flying insects.

Nesting Habits: They build cup-shaped nests in trees or shrubs.

Eastern Kingbird
AspectInformation
Species NameEastern Kingbird
Scientific NameTyrannus tyrannus
CountryNorth America
Number of EggsTypically 2-4 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsAbout 16-18 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes
Body SizeApproximately 7-9 inches
Body WeightAround 1.2 to 1.6 ounces
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous, but may dive at intruders near the nest
Maximum Flight HeightTypically fly at moderate heights, not extremely high
WeatherPrefer open areas, not specific to particular weather
Birds (yes or no)Yes, it’s a bird
Total TypesNot specified
Total ColorDark gray to black upperparts, white underparts, and a white-tipped tail.

Brown Pelican

The Brown Pelican is a fascinating coastal bird with a broad wingspan, despite not being completely brown.

Range and Habitat: Coastal regions of North and South America, often near ocean waters.

Diet: Fish.

Nesting Habits: They nest in colonies on the ground or in trees.

Brown Pelican
AspectInformation
Species NameBrown Pelican
Scientific NamePelecanus occidentalis
CountryCoastal regions of North and South America
Number of EggsUsually 2-3 eggs in a clutch
Incubation Period for EggsAbout 28-30 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes
Body SizeLarge
Body WeightApproximately 4-8 pounds (1.8-3.6 kg)
Dangerous for HumansTypically not dangerous to humans, but can be protective of nests
Maximum Flight HeightTypically below 3,000 feet (900 meters)
WeatherOften found in coastal areas with warm and temperate climates
Birds (yes or no)Yes
Total TypesA single species (Brown Pelican)
Total ColorBrown and white plumage with dark markings

Brown Booby

Another coastal bird with brown plumage that is frequently found in tropical and subtropical areas is the brown booby.

Range and Habitat: Tropical and subtropical oceans, often on islands.

Diet: Fish and squid.

Nesting Habits: They nest in colonies on cliffs or in trees.

Brown Booby
AspectInformation
Species NameBrown Booby
Scientific NameSula leucogaster
CountryFound in tropical and subtropical regions, including the Americas, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific Islands.
Number of EggsUsually lays 1 to 2 eggs per nesting season.
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 4 to 5 weeks
Migration (yes or no)No, they are mostly sedentary, with some local movements.
Body SizeMedium to large-sized seabird with a length of about 71-81 cm (28-32 inches).
Body WeightTypically weighs between 900 to 1,500 grams (1.9 to 3.3 pounds).
Dangerous for HumansGenerally not considered dangerous to humans unless provoked or disturbed.
Maximum Flight HeightThey can fly at varying heights but are typically low-flying near the water surface.
WeatherThey are adapted to tropical and subtropical climates, often found in warm, coastal areas.
Birds (yes or no)Yes, they are a type of seabird.
Total TypesBrown Boobies belong to the Booby family (Sulidae) and are one of the species within that family.
Total ColorBrown Boobies have brown plumage, with white undersides and faces. Their feet and bills are yellowish.

Northern Rough-winged Swallow

The Rough-winged Northern The little brown bird known as a swallow is distinguished by microscopic serrations on the leading edges of its wings.

Range and Habitat: North America, often near water.

Diet: Insects.

Nesting Habits: They nest in burrows or crevices in banks or cliffs.

Northern Rough-winged Swallow
AspectInformation
Species NameNorthern Rough-winged Swallow
Scientific NameStelgidopteryx serripennis
CountryNorth America
Number of EggsTypically 4-5 eggs
Incubation Period for EggsApproximately 15-16 days
Migration (yes or no)Yes
Body SizeSmall
Body WeightAbout 16-20 grams
Dangerous for HumansNot dangerous; non-aggressive bird
Maximum Flight HeightLow to moderate altitudes
WeatherHe prefers warm, temperate climates
Birds (yes or no)Yes
Total TypesOne species in the Northern Rough-winged Swallow category
Total ColorBrown with a pale throat and rump

Conclusion

North America is home to a wide variety of brown birds, each with its own range, habitat, diet, and nesting habits. These birds contribute to the rich biodiversity of the continent and offer bird enthusiasts the opportunity to observe and appreciate their unique characteristics in different ecosystems. Whether you’re in a suburban area or a remote wilderness, you’re likely to encounter some of these fascinating brown birds during your birdwatching adventures.

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